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add matrix user contact details

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Craig Stewart 7 months ago
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  1. 2
      blog/feed/entries/atom
  2. 2
      blog/feed/entries/by_tag/sysadmin.xml
  3. 1
      contact.html

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blog/feed/entries/atom

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" ><generator uri="https://jekyllrb.com/" version="3.8.7">Jekyll</generator><link href="/blog/feed/entries/atom" rel="self" type="application/atom+xml" /><link href="/" rel="alternate" type="text/html" /><updated>2020-12-28T21:15:51+00:00</updated><id>/blog/feed/entries/atom</id><title type="html">My Blog</title><subtitle>The Personal Blog of a Geek</subtitle><entry><title type="html">Further thoughts on Identity</title><link href="/blog/2020/09/20/further-thoughts-on-identity.html" rel="alternate" type="text/html" title="Further thoughts on Identity" /><published>2020-09-20T17:55:00+01:00</published><updated>2020-09-20T17:55:00+01:00</updated><id>/blog/2020/09/20/further-thoughts-on-identity</id><content type="html" xml:base="/blog/2020/09/20/further-thoughts-on-identity.html">&lt;p&gt;Some time ago I wrote a blog post asking the question &lt;a href=&quot;/blog/2019/06/16/who-are-you-really.html&quot; title=&quot;Who are you really?&quot;&gt;“Who are you really?”&lt;/a&gt; It didn’t come to any real conclusion, it only expressed the fact that it was a topic I had been thinking about. I didn’t immediately stop thinking about it, but it drifted out of the forefront of my thoughts to the point that I still haven’t really got a good conclusion. But I have been reminded of the topic recently by an article on LWN about &lt;a href=&quot;https://lwn.net/SubscriberLink/831401/4170e588cdfdfc7f/&quot; title=&quot;Key signing in the pandemic era&quot;&gt;issues Debian is facing with key signing&lt;/a&gt;. Now the issues that Debian is facing very much reflect the issues I had that led to my previous blog post. How do you trust an identity? What value does that identity hold in itself, and what value can you ascribe to associated details.&lt;/p&gt;
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" ><generator uri="https://jekyllrb.com/" version="3.8.7">Jekyll</generator><link href="/blog/feed/entries/atom" rel="self" type="application/atom+xml" /><link href="/" rel="alternate" type="text/html" /><updated>2021-01-02T22:26:17+00:00</updated><id>/blog/feed/entries/atom</id><title type="html">My Blog</title><subtitle>The Personal Blog of a Geek</subtitle><entry><title type="html">Further thoughts on Identity</title><link href="/blog/2020/09/20/further-thoughts-on-identity.html" rel="alternate" type="text/html" title="Further thoughts on Identity" /><published>2020-09-20T17:55:00+01:00</published><updated>2020-09-20T17:55:00+01:00</updated><id>/blog/2020/09/20/further-thoughts-on-identity</id><content type="html" xml:base="/blog/2020/09/20/further-thoughts-on-identity.html">&lt;p&gt;Some time ago I wrote a blog post asking the question &lt;a href=&quot;/blog/2019/06/16/who-are-you-really.html&quot; title=&quot;Who are you really?&quot;&gt;“Who are you really?”&lt;/a&gt; It didn’t come to any real conclusion, it only expressed the fact that it was a topic I had been thinking about. I didn’t immediately stop thinking about it, but it drifted out of the forefront of my thoughts to the point that I still haven’t really got a good conclusion. But I have been reminded of the topic recently by an article on LWN about &lt;a href=&quot;https://lwn.net/SubscriberLink/831401/4170e588cdfdfc7f/&quot; title=&quot;Key signing in the pandemic era&quot;&gt;issues Debian is facing with key signing&lt;/a&gt;. Now the issues that Debian is facing very much reflect the issues I had that led to my previous blog post. How do you trust an identity? What value does that identity hold in itself, and what value can you ascribe to associated details.&lt;/p&gt;
&lt;p&gt;This leads me to lean more and more towards the idea that we place too much value on a single physical body as the “true” identity, and all other aspects are chained to this. To an open source project the value of the identity isn’t in a warm body, but in the contributions they make. Now the discussion within the debian project appears to be headed that way, and this I think is the correct way to handle that. But this also raises a question of trust. Our society has largely developed systems of trust based around individual interactions, and it is easier to build trust if these interactions are face to face. Many would probably argue that this means I am wrong to like the movement away from chaining online digital identities to physical people, but I would like to suggest that fewer of our face to face interactions are the sort that should build trust, or are with the entities that we should be trusting. Banking is done increasingly online, and even when it isn’t the person at the bank you deal with is likely to have very little discretion to alter the possible outcomes much. Trusting the bank clerk works in the bank’s favour, but a trustworthy bank clerk doesn’t mean the bank is trustworthy. Similarly supermarkets, ISPs, Utility providers, etc, are all large organisations that manipulate our ingrained trust mechanisms to make it easier to take our custom, but they don’t build trust in us based on the individual interactions we have, but rather through data-mining done by credit reference agencies, and information about us on public record. This I think demonstrates that our current trust mechanisms have failed individuals, and we need to build new ones, and we may as well do so in a way that allows us to separate our identities, such that they can be trusted for what they are, and not who we are, or who we were.&lt;/p&gt;

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blog/feed/entries/by_tag/sysadmin.xml

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" ><generator uri="https://jekyllrb.com/" version="3.8.7">Jekyll</generator><link href="/blog/feed/entries/by_tag/sysadmin.xml" rel="self" type="application/atom+xml" /><link href="/" rel="alternate" type="text/html" /><updated>2020-12-28T21:15:51+00:00</updated><id>/blog/feed/entries/by_tag/sysadmin.xml</id><title type="html">My Blog</title><subtitle>The Personal Blog of a Geek</subtitle><entry><title type="html">Migrating my blog workflow to WSL</title><link href="/blog/2020/08/02/migrating-to-wsl.html" rel="alternate" type="text/html" title="Migrating my blog workflow to WSL" /><published>2020-08-02T21:30:00+01:00</published><updated>2020-08-02T21:30:00+01:00</updated><id>/blog/2020/08/02/migrating-to-wsl</id><content type="html" xml:base="/blog/2020/08/02/migrating-to-wsl.html">&lt;p&gt;I’m a Linux systems administrator. This means I am not as skilled at supporting and maintaining windows based systems as I am Linux systems. As such my personal laptop has Debian installed, and I have a number of Debian servers (some hosted at a VPS provider, some at home). I also have a Desktop that I built myself, using high spec components (at the time). As the desktop was intended to be used for gaming I bought a Windows license for it. At the time the intent was to install Debian, and then create a KVM virtual machine to run Windows in. However out of impatience, laziness, and hubris (I could always fix it later right?) I installed windows directly onto the system drive. And now the hinge on my laptop lid is broken. As my blog is split across two git repositories (one private, and one public) and publishing new posts involves a workflow that requires me to use a number of linux based systems this is a sub-optimal state of affairs.&lt;/p&gt;
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" ><generator uri="https://jekyllrb.com/" version="3.8.7">Jekyll</generator><link href="/blog/feed/entries/by_tag/sysadmin.xml" rel="self" type="application/atom+xml" /><link href="/" rel="alternate" type="text/html" /><updated>2021-01-02T22:26:17+00:00</updated><id>/blog/feed/entries/by_tag/sysadmin.xml</id><title type="html">My Blog</title><subtitle>The Personal Blog of a Geek</subtitle><entry><title type="html">Migrating my blog workflow to WSL</title><link href="/blog/2020/08/02/migrating-to-wsl.html" rel="alternate" type="text/html" title="Migrating my blog workflow to WSL" /><published>2020-08-02T21:30:00+01:00</published><updated>2020-08-02T21:30:00+01:00</updated><id>/blog/2020/08/02/migrating-to-wsl</id><content type="html" xml:base="/blog/2020/08/02/migrating-to-wsl.html">&lt;p&gt;I’m a Linux systems administrator. This means I am not as skilled at supporting and maintaining windows based systems as I am Linux systems. As such my personal laptop has Debian installed, and I have a number of Debian servers (some hosted at a VPS provider, some at home). I also have a Desktop that I built myself, using high spec components (at the time). As the desktop was intended to be used for gaming I bought a Windows license for it. At the time the intent was to install Debian, and then create a KVM virtual machine to run Windows in. However out of impatience, laziness, and hubris (I could always fix it later right?) I installed windows directly onto the system drive. And now the hinge on my laptop lid is broken. As my blog is split across two git repositories (one private, and one public) and publishing new posts involves a workflow that requires me to use a number of linux based systems this is a sub-optimal state of affairs.&lt;/p&gt;
&lt;p&gt;So the work flow as it is involves the private git repository, which contains my site as a jekyll site. This is checked out on my laptop, and I make edits using vim. I use jekyll to serve a version of this site on localhost whilst I am making changes to ensure I am happy with how it looks (well as happy as I can be given the design, I still need to work on that). These changes are then built to a directory that is a copy of the public repository also checked out on my laptop, but on a non-default branch. I then commit these changes, push them to my git server and raise a pull request. Once the pull request is merged the changes are pushed to the servers. Now I recognise that this is a slightly clunky workflow, and I could probably improve it with a little effort. But it works for me, on Linux, that I am used too. Now that my laptop is broken (actually I’ve fixed it, but the fix is temporary at best) I should probably get this workflow working somewhere that is usable.&lt;/p&gt;

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contact.html

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<p>Or if that fails I can be contacted by <a href="server@craig-james-stewart.co.uk">email</a>.</p>
<p>I have set up a <a href="https://matrix.org/" title="Matrix.org">matrix</a> server, and can my handle is @craig:stewart.zone</p>
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